This Week in Self-Publishing: Migrating to Amazon KDP

This Week

Books sold: 4 ebooks

Money earned: $5.59

Money spent: $0

Total

Books sold: 350 ebooks, 144 paperbacks

Money earned (book sales): $1,409.98

Money earned (Patreon): $6,909

Money spent: $4,855.71


This weekend, I’m going to transfer The Biographies of Ordinary People: Volume 1 over to Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing.

KDP is giving Pronoun writers the opportunity to keep their current reviews and sales ranking, so that seems like the smartest move for now.

I used Kindle Create to re-create the Vol. 1 ebook, since the current ebook is Pronoun-branded. (Also because eventually I’ll want both ebooks to match.) It took me less than an hour to dump my .docx file into Kindle Create and format it, which… I don’t think Kindle Create existed last year, or I would have considered it as an option. It is GREAT. Better even than Pronoun was, because it offers a WYSIWYG editor and much more flexibility.

The big question is whether I go KDP Select, which means being Amazon-exclusive. Originally I had thought that I wouldn’t do Select, but after getting this lovely treatment from KDP and discovering how much fun Kindle Create is, I’m a bit… why not go FULL AMAZON?

At least for 90 days.

Because when you go KDP Select, you commit to being Kindle-exclusive for at least 90 days, and during that time your book goes on Kindle Unlimited and the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library and you can do Kindle Countdowns and other promotions.

And at this point I’m kinda… why not try it?

I’ve tried just about everything else during this publishing process: querying agents, self-publishing with an indie distributor, submitting to a hybrid publisher (still haven’t heard back btw), and now joining KDP.

I figure I shouldn’t be KDP Select when Vol. 2 launches, if only to give all of the people who bought it on iTunes and Google Play the chance to buy the second one. But there will definitely be 90 days between now and Vol. 2‘s launch. (STILL HOPING FOR MAY 2018!)

It is worth noting that only 45 of my 350 ebook sales came from NOT AMAZON. Seven from Barnes & Noble, 11 from Google Play, 15 from iTunes, and 12 from Kobo. I do value you, 45 readers, and I don’t want to leave you out of the next one, but it’s also clear where the majority of my readers are shopping.

So… I mean, what do you think? What would you do, if you were me? ❤️

 

2 Replies to “This Week in Self-Publishing: Migrating to Amazon KDP”

  1. allreb

    A few days belated at this point, but I would tend to be leery of being exclusive. (Not just because I’m a Nook user who is frequently frustrated by Amazon-only releases.) As you noted last week, you don’t own the distribution channels – so if you become fully reliant on Amazon exclusively and the change contract terms in a way that hurts you — like Patreon tried to — you then don’t have any other channels as backup to rely on.

    But then again, Amazon is where your market is, so it may be worth it to take that risk. You are a numbers person so I’m sure you have done the math on that part already. 🙂

    • Nicole

      Well, I can leave Select if I need to—but it turns out it’s a non-issue because I can’t be in Select if my ebook’s in libraries.

Leave a Reply