This Week in Self-Publishing: My Book Is Back on Kobo

This Week

Books sold: 1 ebook (Amazon), 1 paperback

Money earned: $6.12

Money spent: $0

Total

Books sold: 353 ebooks, 146 paperbacks

Money earned (book sales): $1,424.50

Money earned (Patreon): $6,909

Money spent: $4,855.71


Here’s an update on where we are in the “get my book back onto the various distribution channels” process:

  • Amazon: Done! Brand-new ebook via Kindle Create! You can also buy the paperback!
  • Kobo: Done! I had to use the old Pronoun epub because it didn’t include a build-a-book service and I couldn’t export the new ebooks I made on Kindle Create and Nook Press. (We shouldn’t be too surprised that both of these retailers don’t want you sharing their ebooks with other retailers.)
  • Barnes & Noble: Mostly done! The paperback is available, and the Nook Press ebook I created is under review.
  • Google Books: Mostly done! No build-a-book service here, so they’re reviewing the Pronoun epub version.
  • Apple iBooks: Nowhere near done! They’re still reviewing my tax information (so I can create a vendor account), and then I’ll have to decide whether I want to build a new ebook through iBooks Author, which will require me to input my text one chapter at a time (ugh) or just give ’em the Pronoun epub.

Both the Kindle Create and Nook Press processes were very simple: paste entire text, make sure the chapter titles are formatted the way you want them, publish. The italics and special formatting stuff all transferred over; I didn’t have to go back and redo a bunch of itals and paragraph breaks.

AFAIK I don’t think I’ll be able to do that with iBooks, but I’ll keep poking around with it.

Also, now I need to remember to check every retailer every week to see how many sales I’ve made.


In other news, Biographies Vol. 1 was just reviewed on What Cathy Read Next. It’s a lengthy and thoughtful review, so I’ll just quote one paragraph and suggest you read the whole thing on your own:

Meredith is the character that resonated most strongly with me. She’s clever, thoughtful, bookish, protective towards her younger sisters, competitive but perhaps over-absorbed by the desire to get things right and, in this respect, can come across as mature beyond her years. At one point she muses, “I wonder if I am good at anything that I haven’t practiced”. Meredith seems absolutely real as a character with the good points and flaws that make up all humans and I think this is the author’s chief accomplishment that, in this book, she has created truly realistic characters that you feel you could meet in the street or the local shop.

I love reading other people’s responses to this book because there are a number of similarities between the reviews—most of them focusing on character—along with the types of differences that come from personal background, preference, and interpretation. I know I’ve written this before, but I appreciate so much that my book has not yet been misunderstood; whether the readers like it or not, they understand what it is and what I was trying to communicate with the story. They aren’t telling me that I inadvertently wrote a different story than I intended to.

If you’re a book blogger who is interested in reviewing either Vol. 1 or the forthcoming Vol. 2, let me know. I’d be more than happy to send over a copy. ❤️

 

8 Replies to “This Week in Self-Publishing: My Book Is Back on Kobo”

  1. Liz

    I bought your book today and have started reading it. I look forward to a day of reading tomorrow or tonight! I’m still figuring out how to upload directly to iBooks. I have iTunes producer but I can’t find where to upload a darn book and yet my dashboard is telling me I have no books lol

    • Nicole

      Yeah, that’s where I am in the iBooks process too! My tax forms and etc. just went through, so all I have to do is… figure out how to upload a book.

      Also, thank you for buying mine! I hope you enjoy it.

      • Liz

        I haven’t found the button to upload that book yet but I hope I do because there are more opportunities to promote with iBooks when you direct.

        I’m on the second chapter and I’m enjoying the book! Will post a review on my blog and on Amazon when I’m done 🙂

  2. Art Kavanagh

    Hi Nicole

    I’m guessing that (a) because you’re thinking of using iBooks Author, that you’ve got a Mac and (b) that your manuscript is in Word. If these assumptions are correct, you can open your manuscript in Pages (free download if you haven’t got it already) tidy it up as necessary and export to ePub 3. Pages may not be good for much but it can produce a mean ePub 3 file. Open that file in iBooks (on your Mac or iOS device) and review it. Upload this to iTunes Connect.

    If iTunes Connect accepts it, so should Kobo and most other ebook sellers/distributors (including KDP, though it took me a while to notice that).

    That’s how I’d do it, anyway.

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